How to Stop a Dog Who Pees for Revenge

dog peeing

My dog pees in the house for revenge because he is alone all day. He pees for revenge.

My dog pees in the house to get even with me for going out without him. He pees for revenge.

Which of the above statements are true?

Here’s a photo of a dog waiting to go outside so you can think for a minute and then scroll past the photo for the answer.

dog urination

The answer is BOTH ARE FALSE.

When a dog urinates or defecates in a place he normally shouldn’t, a multitude of reasons can cause this, but revenge/spite/trying to anger you are not on that list.

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Dogs React to Us

It isn’t pleasant to step in a puddle of (hidden) cold dog pee saturated deep within the carpet. A typical reaction to this is probably some along the lines of “dammit, INSERT NAME HERE, what did you do?”

Yelling, shouting, shaming, or “punishing” a dog for such a behavior is not going to prevent the accident from happening in the future.

A dog’s cowering, hiding, sorrowful eyes, or lowered head when yelling, shouting, or a harsh tone is taken at finding such an accident teaches the dog to be afraid of you. As smart as most dogs are, they aren’t manipulative enough to ponder the art of revenge: That’s a human quality. Do you know how to stop a dog who pees for revenge? You don’t! Dogs do NOT pee for revenge. And do not under any circumstances “rub their nose in it:” This is antiquated, disgusting, and old wives’ tale and proves only what a bully you are in doing so.

How to stop a dog who pees for revenge

Dogshaming

A website, book, and memes galore have been built around the notion of  “dogshaming.”

Putting funny signs in front of a dog who looks like he or she did something does not mean the dog actually feels that way. Memes are meant for good humor and laughs. Dogs do not exact revenge on people. It’s just not their way.

Reasoning it Out

Dogs live in the moment. This we know. Dogs don’t ponder what’s going to happen five minutes from now let alone what might happen when their parent leaves for work tomorrow. Dogs might anticipate departure, hence a dog’s reaction when keys are heard jingling or his parent puts a pair of shoes on for a walk. Some dogs love to go for a ride, while others loathe it.

Dogs do have emotions. They do not have the foresight to willingly inflict emotional upset on people.

Planning Ahead

Ponder this: When a special occasion happens in the family, does a dog plan ahead, act extra nice, or otherwise go out of his or her way to extend himself because it is an extra special day?

No.

A happy dog is just that: happy dog: A joyful pooch who loves nothing more than to be around his pack, whether that means one person or a whole family…. he remains that joyful dog no matter what day it is. That is, unless, someone is upsetting to the dog, the dog is sick, or something emotional has happened in the dog’s life.

Dogs don’t have a date planner. Dogs do, however, show emotions with their body language, behavior, and “in the moment” thinking.

For a dog to pee in the house, plan ahead to do so, not know when you will find it, and then know you will get angry and start yelling or scolding them: Well, that takes a whole lot of calculated forward and vengeful thinking. Of all the emotions a dog has, getting even with you is not one of them.

dog peeing behavior

Dogs Who Pee for Revenge

There is no such concept as dogs who pee for revenge. We place human feelings and emotions on dog, and in many cases, rightfully so: Dogs have a huge array of emotions. If we are happy and celebrate life, our dogs are happy for us.  When we are in a bad mood, dogs either try to snap us out of it or hunker down to get through it with you or hide in corner from a loud or irritated voice.

Dogs will pee if they are scared.

Dogs will pee if they have an emotional issue.

Dogs will pee if they are puppies.

Dogs will pee if they are left alone too long.

Dogs will pee because they are marking a spot.

Dogs will pee because they are older and cannot hold it.

Dogs will pee because there is a health problem.

Dogs will not pee out of revenge.

Dogs do not deserve to be hit nor should they be spanked, slapped, have their nose rubbed “in it” or any similar behavior. This only serves to instill fear, the latter of which is unsanitary, disgusting, and an old wives’ tale that seems to take place in homes across the world. Doing it doesn’t make it right and can actually harm your dog.

What to Do

If your dog is urinating in the house, any number of reasons exist, but revenge is not one of them. Science says so, too.  Some believe that guilt is complicated; we believe that dogs are not (complicated): they simply love us and would not purposely or with calculated intent seek to be punished.

The above applies as much to number “two” as it does number “one.”

Our Favorite Products to Clean Up Dog Urine From the Carpet


Comments

  1. This is something I learned when reading the Decoding Your Dog book. I would still swear that Shiner will occasionally pee for “revenge” or out of spite for something, but I know that this is not true and scientifically proven. I don’t punish her and I don’t make her “feel bad” about it. It rarely happens and when it does, it is just one occasion out of the blue.

    • THAT is a great book, and we have read it. I totally believe that dogs do not do peeing or pooping for revenge on us.

      • Great post, Carol.

        I’ve just recently finished reading the Decoding Your Dog book. I think the potty training chapter was actually one of my favorites! It was very well written and full of good information.

        I loved the one example where the owners thought the dog was acting “guilty,”
        But then later on when they got a new puppy, the dog would act the same way when the puppy had an accident. And then it really sunk in for the owners that the dog was just responding to their body language and emotions, because the dog knew the humans would react to the puddle on the floor.

    • I totally agree with the revenge peeing. If my dog does not want to do something …example go out side to pee. She runs and lays down and pees right then and there. This just about the only time she has done this except two other times when she was had worms when we got her..
      I had a dog who every time. Left the house she defecated everywhere! And yes I did cage her along with other doggie options . It done NO good.

      • I have an 8 year old chocolate lab and I can’t seem to pin point WHEN he is peeing in the house but he only pees on furniture or the walls in the living room. It’s destroying my home but the dog belongs to the kids and I am at an absolute loss as to what to do. I am guilty of the yelling and smacking him on the butt for it. I’m just so frustrated.. Last summer I bought a new couch and love seat. I blocked off the front entrance which is where he’s always pee’d and now he’s peeing on the new furniture.. I tossed the lazy boy out the other day to wake up this morning to see that he pee’d all over the TV stand. PLEASE anyone HELP ME!!!

    • I respectfully disagree. My dog does it out of revenge. I just got back from playing outside and taking him to the normal poo spot. then when we all go inside he will go poo on my deck. He only does it when we don’t let him in the house or when he see’s me playing with other dogs inside, etc. This last time, we just got back and he was on the deck for under 5 min and went in the corner. It is spite.

      • I agree dogs do things out of revenge and spite and they are smarter than given credit as a kid I had a dog who was my best friend I talked to him about stuff I didn’t feel I could talk to another person about and pet him and I’m not saying he understood but in a way he picked up on how I felt and he responded (comforting and keeping a person away who i would tell him hurt me )when we got another dog he walk up my mother made eye contact and peed on the clothes she just cleaned and even now I have a dog and she peed I cleaned it and scolded her and when I went to wash my hands she peed in the same spot for scolding her smh

        • I think they do it out of spite. My male dog has started peeing and pooing upstairs. I blocked him from being able to get to that area. I noticed wet spots and poo even after blocking him. So I waited and watched..he went upstairs and I waited for a bit then I went up. I couldn’t find him anywhere. I called his name and he came crawling out from under the bed. So, he was scooting under the bed to get to that spot. I cleaned all the carpets yesterday only to find poo there this morning. I am home all day every day. He goes out all day long and does his business..so why is he doing this. And the fact that he goes upstairs to hide it makes me believe he knows what he is doing.

          • I agree, My dads dog absolutely pees on the floor out of spite. He works far out in the city and he’s only home on the weekends. He arrives Friday and leaves Sunday night. My dad is the dogs favorite human, she follows him around and sleeps with him when hes home. Every Sunday he packs his bag and gets ready for another work week and every Sunday before he leaves she pees on the floor. Monday through Friday she does not pee on the floor at all, not once. Please explain again how dogs dont plan things?? Shes been doing this for 2 years now BTW. SOUNDS PRETTY PLANNED!

      • Agree wholeheartedly. My 4 year old Pug would still be pooping and urinating in his crate, had we not bought an extra small crate. He is spoiled, and at times has to be crated. He will still urinate in his crate if his bladder is not completely empty. He even finds some, and lets loose! He is not ill, and is loved. If we accidentally leave the bathroom door open where he is crated, he will urinate on the shower curtain and rug! Frustrated beyond belief with this dog. He only wants to sleep with my daughter, yet, will want out and to eat anytime he hears activity in the kitchen, We are talking 3, 4, or 5 in the morning!

    • Hi Ann, allow me to introduce myself, my name is Freddy, and I am a dog trainer for over 19 years now, in S.I., N.Y.. My 1st question is hw old is your dog ? Has your dog been checked 4 diabetes ? BC they do get it just like us. If your dog is young, and accidents arise, take your dog back out, to let it become to going outside more, and reward it when doing so. May I also recommend, substituting water for ice cubes, and reducing her water intake especially at night.

  2. The only place a dog takes revenge is in movies! Very informative article, now hope those that think they are peeing for revenge will wake up and realize NO, they are not!

    • Check this, you re-frame it however you want, and not actually do the real work, and figure out that your dog has very much human behavior because homo sapiens don’t adapt to the their environments and don’t pick up human behavior is insane! Know your science more than old dog books and behaviors. Some of you here need psychological help! Your dogs are smarter than you think, and do posses the emotional negativity like humans. You just don’t to admit that your dog actually can hate you like a human being. Dogs are all about survival tactics. Just like a human can live with someone and throw a lamp, bottle, kick a chair. Dogs do the same, except they pee, or chew up a brand new bed you got your dog, or scratch up the walls. Dogs have evolved, if you don’t want to believe or not, they have. I need you to evolve as well, and stop looking at your dog as some furry little creature that you find adorable. Dogs know what they want and what they don’t want, like humans. To think that all dogs are from the same DNA of other dogs, and dogs don’t possess the emotional trait of spite/revenge is crazy! Your nuts! Dogs are just Dogs anymore. Kids are just kids anymore. Adults aren’t just adults. We all evolve along with our environments.

      • I truly believe my dog is peeing on everyting strictly to piss me off the same way I piss him off when I run to the store and don’t take him with me. Anyone who thinks dogs aren’t smart enough or evolved enough to express this emotion is in my opinion nuts!!!

  3. One of the biggest things I’ve learned the past year in nose work and tracking courses is how dogs are not at all doing things for reasons we think. They see things in their own way and we humanize it all which is what messes things up and doesn’t get to the root of a behavior.

  4. The article is very informative. But BJ did show his displeasure when I brought in a foster dog. He peed in the house. As soon as the foster was out of the house, he stopped.

  5. My Mama and Papa like to joke that I make accidents happen “out of revenge/spite,” but they understand that it is not premeditated. That said, I do it 1. When I am left alone for awhile, but also 2. When I am left alone for a very short while… sometimes as little as 5 to 10 minutes. I get anxious being separated from the pack.

    We agree with your argument, but we’d like to see more of “What to Do;” would you consider updating the last section to include some suggestions for how to improve this behavior using alternative methods?

      • Please give us ways to stop it. We call them Protest Poops.

        MY dogs have two doggie doors. one is always available. Often times when I come home from work or even just being gone for an hour, I come home to a pile of poop in front of the door I leave and return from.

        She knows what she is doing. She uses the outside all the time!

  6. Great post! It always boils my blood when I hear someone say “my dog did that to spite me for doing this/that”. No, they didn’t! That’s not how they think.

    • We honestly do not know ho animals think.
      If they could not think in terms of revenge then why do they do things they know will get them in trouble? I am sure they know exactly what they are doing. Because when caught they look guilty and hunker down or run lol.

      • We do know how animals think. There are scientific journals galore and studies at top veterinary universities. Dogs look guilty as you say because you are scolding them or verbally unhappy. Humans are the only ones who have revenge in them.

        • I think you’re stuck on the word “revenge” and “premeditated” and it is somewhat an inaccurate word to describe the dogs’ behavior. They’re not plotting but they are displaying instinctive defiant behavior , just like how revenge is instinctive with some people. However, I think what most people mean is that when their dog is unhappy with being left alone, or having a new dog brought in for example, that they do intentionally enact or express this unhappiness by doing instinctively something that is destructive or they know upsets their owner. The fact that you can’t explain away the causal result people are describing from their unhappy pets means there’s no scientific evidence to prove that it’s NOT an instinctive reaction to show their displeasure to their owners. I think people are just being hyperbolic when they say revenge. They’re not strategizing but dogs absolutely act intentionally because they are that smart and so are cats.

  7. I do agree most dogs are not revengeful, but I feel my parents’ (spoiled rotten) cocker spaniel was an exception. Years ago, my dad had to put her in the garage for about two hours. The very next day, she pooped on his side of the bed. Something similar happened a few years later–she got mad and pooped on my parents’ bed.

  8. Yall crazy if you think dogs dont pee out of spite. Especially if they only do it when you tell them to move cause they want to play and be rubbed on. When she spite pees its clear regular urination is darker. She does it cause she wants attention.

  9. I’d love to hear anyone’s take on this as not being a case of spite peeing and pooping.

    My girl friend’s adult dog that she’s had for about 4 years is very bright and has a great personality, but is really sassy too.

    If she doesn’t get what she wants–a hand out, you make her go outside when she doesn’t want to or don’t let her outside when shes wants to (she will hold it for a surprisingly long amount of time), she doesn’t get to go on the couch or a bed that she wants to, etc.–she will run to another room the moment you turn your back. When she returns to where you are looking all proud of herself, you’ve got a big old mess to clean up.

    I understand the idea that dog’s aren’t really capable of planning per say, but that seems to be an action/reaction scenario that can only be viewed as some type of “revenge”, even if it is a little more amorphous than the human conception of such.

    Regardless, we’re struggling with ways to get her out of it, any ideas would be welcomed and appreciated.

    • MJ, let me get some expert feedback for you and I promise to come back and answer. Thanks so much for coming here to ask!

    • i agree with u my dog knows how to use the pad but when he doesn’t get his way he pees only on the edge or if i add to he pee’s on two in the middle most the time he would spitefully not pee on the pad just on edge i know he knows better cus there are days he use it correctly but the moment we dont let him eat what we eating or let him beg when we eating or let him sleep in our beds he poops or pee in the middle of floor if its not revenge he’s must be just doing it for attention either way im tired of it pads cost to much to allow him keep peeing and pooping on the floor .sometimes he even come to us and try to show us what he did then he runs when we see it

  10. My dog pees if I leave him longer than 5 hours (yes, I had him tested), which if you work for a living, happens often. So I invested in a good deep cleaning carpet cleaner. I guess you can say, I suck it up.

    • That is really good that you do this and are aware. I know some dogs can’t hold it and 5 hours for many dogs means accidents.

  11. I’ve read all the comments but I still don’t have a clue as what to do about it.
    I don’t see them as “accidents’…My cat’s litter & food is in my master bedroom so we keep the door opened just a crack for the cat…however, Jake, my daughters dog, sneaks in there & poops & pees whenever he sees the door a little more opened.
    Jake has gotten into the litter box, pees next to me toilet bowl & poops in front of my
    armoir.
    My daughter & I are besides ourselves & don’t know what to do…can you please help us?

  12. Solutions are needed! This is so frustrating! Our boys just started this last year. No medical issues, and usually not left alone for more than a few hours. Driving us crazy!???

  13. So if the dog or in my case puppy doesn’t pee for revenge then what is it considered when your puppy knows he is in trouble because you yell at him for what he did then pees while looking at you and shows no fear and just anger because he is growling at you? This has been going on for a while and we don’t know how to fix it any suggestions?

  14. I have an 18 month old Maltese who only recently started peeing indoors, he doesn’t run to another room, he doesn’t hide, he doesn’t wait until he’s alone, he’s quite proud, no fear just lifts his leg & pees in front of you, I don’t know why he’s started this, he has constant access to the garden alongside our female Shih tzu who is spayed, she never ever done this, it’s getting frustrating as there are no health issues, he’s neutered & is never alone longer than an hour – 2 hours max, the door to the garden is open he even follows our Shih tzu & does go in the garden, we praise both dogs when they go outside & have done this always, so why would he start this behaviour ? He looks straight at us when he does it, most importantly how do I stop it ?

    It’s easy to think because he looks straight at you when he does this that’s its for attention but one thing my dogs are not starved of & that is attention & affection, I’m tearing my hair out as to why this has started out of the blue

    • Oh honey,lol; Maltese, Havanese, Bichons, all in that “Havanese family” are truly slow to housebreak if they do at all. We have a Maltese and a Havanese. I wish we wouldve known this. They never truly get it; our Maltese is now 15 and our Havanese 13; its been a long road, filled with cold pee puddles, pooping as way of greeting new people who come into the house (the Havanese) ,etc. They all do this; getting them spayed/neutered helps, but even then, its no fix for these smaller breeds. Best advice? Get hardwood, and pray for patience,lol.

        • Carol,

          You are dead wrong when it comes to saying that a dog will never spitefully pee in your house. My wife and I have a male Papillon who, regardless of what you say, will pee out of spite or retaliation for something he doesn’t like. In particular, if he hanging out around the kitchen trying to mooch a snack and we tell him to move, he will walk to his own crate or under our dining room table and stand there and pee. If he’s barking or woofing and told to stop, he’ll do the same thing. My wife and I are retired and home with this dog most of the time but, if we go out without him for any length of time we will let him out to pee right away. He’ll pee outside then he’ll come in many times and pee right in front of my wife. He definitely has some dominance issues related to my wife but, we have worked on those issues together. He has been medically tested and cleared. My wife and I have had a variety of different dogs and never had any problems with them peeing in the house. So, when this dog only pees in the house when he is told to do something he doesn’t like and he will stand there glaring at us while he pees an enormous puddle, if its not a form of revenge or spite then tell us what it is and how to correct it please. We have a female Papillon too and she never pees in the house. Both dogs are fixed. She’s 15 years old and he’s 8 years old and despite all of our efforts, he’s getting worse everyday.

          • I completely disagree. People have spite, and dogs do not. It could be a marking behavior, a scent marking, or one of any other things. However, spite pee is not something a dog does. She is 15? Well having had a 15 year old dog, incontinence is an issue and you need to have that checked by a professional.

        • Oh yeah? Well, how do you explain the recent behavior of my 2-year-old potty-trained, regularly-walked-twice-a-day male Maltese who, for the first time ever, peed and pooed on my bed while I was out for 6 hours, a longer time than I’d normally do an errand?

          I had left him alone in the dining area/foyer of my flat, placing his favorite toys easily accessible and making sure that there were 3 designated areas nearby spread with “accident” pads that were rubbed with some urine and poo scooped up from our first toilet outing of the day (since I knew I’d be away longer than usual from him), ….only to find, coming home, that he had somehow, squeezed his hairy but petite frame through the sliding door that separated my bedroom from the hallway and that he made a point on showing his anger and spite by dumping exactly on the bed spot that I’d immediately notice when I came in the room. It was the part that I failed to completely cover with the comforter. Thank goodness he didn’t do it on the fluffy silk comforter!

          BTW, I’ve never allowed him to get on the bed even when, several times while still a puppy, he tried his cutest best to join me laying on the bed because I was either sick or lazy to get up. I simply gently pushed him off at the same time mouthing a firm “no!”.

          When his foul deed was done, he obviously squeezed his way out of the bedroom to go back to where I was expecting to find him wagging his tail when I opened the door – except that, aside from the loving welcome, I could immediately gauged that his one-sided gaze meant “whatever I did serves you right, pal!”

          • Humphrey said his 8 year old male dog not the 15 year old female Carol…and you keep saying it’s just marking, incontinence etc. Animals can feel happy and loving which they display with playing, tail wagging, licking, snuggling and they can see OUR pleased reaction so obviously they also feel annoyance and anger which they display by peeing and pooing to displease us.

  15. I took my puppy from a dog foster home about a year ago. I love him to bits; he has a great personality, and I feel that he loves our family so much. BUT, whenever I leave him at home he pees in the house: on the carpet, on the bed, on flowers..
    My husband and I were thinking about taking him to ‘doggy school’, but then again, it’s extremely expensive, and the nearest ‘doggy school’ is far away from us. Maybe you have some advice? THANK YOU!!!!

  16. This morning, when my dog saw me putting my jacket on she ran out and peed right on the door. She does this every time she notices I’m going out. How do I prevent this? It really looks like she is trying to prevent me for going out. She is 4 month

  17. My wonderful, lovely puppy 10 mnth, has taken to peeing beside his food dish. Can’t think what it is due too. He is walked, fed, hiked, loved, pampered. Getting frustrating for us. We carefully trained him, only positive reinforcement but suddenly he has started this issue.

  18. This was a great article with some grey areas and no solutions on this behavior. Our 3.5 month old Frenchie is potty trained. We are currently trying to train her to lay in her bed while we work or study. After a few minutes of rejecting her requests to be on our laps, she will go to the same spot in the house and pee to express her frustration. This would fall under “emotional issue.” It may not be what we would consider premeditated revenge, but that is just semantics.

  19. But what if you let your dog out for ten minutes before you go to the grocery store and come home to find he has peed on the garbage can? Or you let him out before you go to bed and wake up to find a turd at the bottom of the stairs in the middle of the night? Also the poo only happens when you’re boyfriend sleeps over?

    • I am so glad you asked this. Dogs do not think in terms of revenge. A dog is basically a nose with a body attached. I just finished reading an amazing book called “Being a Dog” – following a dog into a world of smell. The author is Alexandra Horowitz. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01CO34JHU/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1

      I gained so much more info on that. Dogs are always in sniff, mark, repeat mode.

      So let’s use your example:

      Grocery store: He knows that if you are present, that the behavior is a no no. He is smelling something in the garbage with his amazing nose receptors and is marking it. He is not trying to tick you off.

      The turd in the middle of the night: Like people, nature calls, and when you gotta go, you gotta go. How else can he tell you he needs to go out if you are sleeping?

      The boyfriend one is easy: Your dog is marking his property. There is a new person in the house. That new person is your boyfriend. He has a distinctive scent. You may not even smell it. Your dog does. Your dog marks his territory when your boyfriend sleeps over.

  20. How then do you explain taking a dog outside, standing with them for 5-10 minutes (to no avail), and then bringing them inside and having them look into your face as they pee on the floor?

    • It is not revenge. Dogs do not have the capacity, fortitude, nor thought process to plan nor exact revenge. That is a human characteristic. Try a different training method. Revert back to maybe what you did to train the dog as a puppy. I used to have piddle pads down, when my dog peed on them I would take the piddle pad outside and my dog and show him outside and praise him. With time, I would see him run to the piddle pad and then pick it up and take it outside. I would praise so much. I had a verbal party for him outside. Eventually he knew that outside was the place to go. Maybe just standing with the dog teaches the dog to just you know, stand. Are you associating a verbal reward or maybe even a small treat when he or she does pee outside?

  21. You people are stupid. “Because science says so” Where does a scientist say so? Where is the extensive researchand published article that I can look through to see their experimentation with a hypothesis? There isnt one because there is no way to properly correlate anything to do with dog brains or emotions. Every dog is different, just like people. And as far as I recall from Psychology 101, there is not even a proper breakdown of the human psyche as of yet, or at least not one that can be completely verified. Sure we can get schematics from breaking down where everything is via autopsy, but there is no defined system on how or why human emotions work as they do. So how can we say that dogs do as well? What about the Russian scientist who combined two dogs together? Do you believr that second dog head, with a fully functioning dog brain, was really living in the moment? Unaware of its dilipatadated condition? I call BS. Also look at the DSM, we have an “understanding” of emotions but we have an entire book of exceptions.

    So you are telling me that my dog has not turned into the most jealous piece of crap dog ever, because my brother got a cat? Despite her constant theft of cat food and water, her now “daily” habit of shitting in the living room everynight, depite the fact that she is let out 30 times a day or more, because of this issue. She is ten years old, never had this issue before.

    She also hates the outdoors, which is how she is punished, by being locked up in a pin outside. She whines, cries, and barks constantly while out there, aware of what she did wrong. Until the neighbors complain about the barking, I dont know what else to do. Vet recommends taking her to a “Pet Psychologist” no joke. What kind of BS is that? My Uncles dog got put on stronger Xanax than my Grandmother, seriously?

    I just dont get you people and your obsession with animals like they are children. Most of you would rather help a poor hungry animal than a human child living in poverty and an abusive environment. Why? Idk maybe you can tell me.

    • Please give your dog to a loving home, Salazar. Dogs should not hate outdoors, kept outdoors as punishment, and IDK why you “believr” (your word, not ours) that is normal. Yikes.

  22. This is the most ridiculous thing I ever read. My dog DOES pee or poop out of spite. Today He was left in his cage all day while we were out. We immediately took him out and he peed. Came inside and within 10 minutes the dog went into my room, got on my bed and peed all over my bed. How can you say this was not spite? If he had to go out and couldn’t hold it he would’ve peed in front of the door like he has in the past. He has NEVER peed on my bed before. Also, 2 times prior when he had been left at home and was upset, he pooped on TOP of the couch. As is where your head rests. He NEVER goes up there. And those times he was taken outside also. So I can tell you 100% without a doubt my dog pees and poops on furniture out of SPITE.

    • Dogs do not have the capacity nor the thinking mechanisms to feel and emit spite. It is a human quality and not a dog quality. While dogs have emotions and complex thought processes, a dog’s reasoning is different from a human’s. Our dogs can tell when we’re upset with them, even though they have no idea what might have caused our angry expression or tone of voice. Your dog’s behavior is anxiety and not spite.

  23. I have a very clever 5 year old boston terrier. Picks up tricks within an hour and can respond to countless commands. Will pee on command outside of the house, in the yard, and will even respond when I say potty in our room by running downstairs and outside in the rain to go potty before bed. Smart and attentive little sucker.

    Leave him at home with access to the back yard (and with a our other dog for companion) for AN HOUR and he’ll go find my purse or my camera bags to mark on them. I put those away and he jumped on the dining room table and peed on the centerpiece (and all over the table). Instantly guilty when I walk in the house and puts himself outside until I call him in.

    If he’s not revenge marking then what do I call this behavior?!?

    • Now, in thinking this through. Knowing the dog is going to be put outside when you come in, why would he do it? He is probably marking his spot on your items. I bet this is a boy dog…and yes, you said “leave him at home” so he is a boy. I call this marking. Not revenge. Dogs do not pee for revenge.

  24. Wrong. If a dog can feel positive emotions like joy or love, they are perfectly capable of feeling negative emotions like spiter frustration. They aren’t robots and they aren’t saints. They are animals like the rest of us.

  25. It’s truly hard to believe they aren’t doing it out of revenge sometimes! My boston terrier (he’s 1 and neutered) will definitely pee when he’s not getting his way. He’s peed directly ON us three times in the house because we were on the phone and couldn’t immediately play with him. Last night around 4am, he went to get water and it was empty – he scratched at the bowl, then came into our room to pee on the bed (with us in it!) it happens so frequently. I read through all of the comments here and I’ve been searching around – do you have any advice for dogs that do seemly pee out of “revenge” for not getting their way? Our boy has to wear a diaper in the house so we can stop him now. We hate it 🙁

  26. My dog will sense that I am about to leave/ not play enough fetch with her (which she demands 24/7) & I will take her out to the bathroom/play fetch with her chuck it- and then she will come inside and pee 3 drops of pee on my main rug, in front of me but sometimes not. To be noted- she only pees on rugs, we have hardwood floors & tile in 95% of our house and a big back yard that she rules. She also has problems going to the bathroom in larger city’s with no grass. She will go on dirt but I can take her out and she will come back to the condo and poop/pee right on the rug- they have mostly hardwood too.

    • Your dog probably anticipates that you are leaving or not playing and gets nervous. Of all the emotions dogs have, revenge is not one of them.

  27. This article is pure malarchy! I have a year old female red nose pitbull.. she was house trained when I got her at 6 months of age. She poops very regular twice a day. Early morning and just before bed. If I leave the house other then my normal routine without takinge her with me she spitefully poops. She first drags all the blankets off my bed. Then she tears all the stuffing from my pillow. Finally she squeezes out a shooter marble sized turd almost dead center of what’s left of the pillow. She leaves the pillow in the center of the bed. She has done this in as little as 15 minutes after pooping outside. The first month I had her she had jo accidents in the house. I literally took her in the car or outside every time I went outside, or went somewhere. The only time she was left alone was while I was working, and my kids were in school. Now that she got used to the routine if I leave and its not a day, or time I am usually at work this spite takes place. She never bothers so much as the garbage mon to fri during working hours. I am calling the science you claim as simply wrong. Noone will convince me otherwise!

  28. I don’t buy this for a second. It was once thought that dogs do not harbor jealousy either. It’s now understood that they do. Hell, anyone who owns a dog and has half a brain can make that simple deduction. Observe. It’s telling and doesn’t need a fancy science experiment.

  29. if they dont revenge pee. can you please explain why when i tell them no about getting on the bed ( cause they have peed on it several time for no reason) they go pee on my blanket. or when one is in kneel while i walk the other 2 they break out and pee even though they have held it many times before. or when they can go days or weeks with no accident then pee on everything for days cause i left the house for a few hours.

  30. I am a firm believer in science. But even with that strong belief and what some scientist has said about it, my mom’s dog DOES pee out of spite. And I’ll tell you why.

    I lost a cat and 2 dogs within 6 months. Kidney cancer and congestive heart failure. We already had a younger dog that we got a year and a half prior to the deaths of my babies. So he has no issue and is one of the most laid back pups I’ve ever seen.

    One of those babies was my mom’s dog Jasmine. A 13 year old standard dachshund. And when the heart failure started, she declined quickly and passed the next day.

    My mom was gutted. And a couple months later, she rescued a poodle mix. Poor thing had been outside most of his life and he was only 8 months old. He had dreads that we shaved off and hundreds of fleas. A shave and 3 washes later, and you have my mom’s dog Joe.

    Now to the attitude.

    My dad just got a puppy. Maybe 2 months old and we’ve had him for a few weeks now.

    The puppy is in the process of being trained so he’s getting a lot of attention.

    Him being my dad’s puppy, he sleeps in my dad’s recliner.

    Joe gets in trouble sometimes because he steps on the pup or bites a little too hard and causes it to yipe.

    Just a simple tap on the nose and a stern no do the trick. But only for a little while.

    Because my dad gives more attention to the puppy, Joe has been peeing in his chair.

    And it is for spite.

    The dog whines and scratches at the door to be let out and stays out for about 30 minutes. So you can’t say he’s not being let out. Dude goes out several times a day.

    He never pees or poops anywhere in the house. Never. Even when he’s been at home alone all day. Never.

    But when my dad gets up to do something, Joe gets up on the chair and pees. I’ve seen him do it.

    And it IS for spite.

    The chair is leather so I clean it regularly so there is no smell.

    The chair cover is washed regularly.

    He is let outside a lot during the day and for a substantial amount of time.

    All because my dad doesn’t give him attention. HE PEES FOR FUCKING SPITE.

    I think some dogs a more intelligent than others and when they’ve been spoilt, they learn new things. Emotions being one of those things.

    And FYI, just because a scientist studied a handful of dogs compared to just how MANY dogs there are on this Earth, doesn’t mean every dog is the same.

    And may i ask why you seem so passionate about the matter?

    • There is an amazing book I’d love to tell you about, Samantha. It gave me such a new appreciation and deeper understanding into a dog’s scent ability. It is called “Being a Dog: Following the Dog Into a World of Smell” by Alexandra Horowitz. Here is the link: https://www.amazon.com/Being-Dog-Following-World-Smell/dp/1476795991

      When humans clean something, as you are the chair cover, it does not make it clean to a dog’s nose. In fact, the dog’s behavior speaks otherwise: He is telling you, I can smell something. I agree every dog isn’t the same. But every dog is born as a dog and dogs do not do spite. Dogs do behavior. Dogs do scenting. Dogs do marking. Dogs do routine. Dogs do not do spite.

      Did you know that a dog’s noseprint is akin to that of a human fingerprint? No two are alike.

      What you call spite, the dog behaviorists in the know call alpha marking. Your dad’s dog had its world rocked with a new puppy. He is marking, not acting with spite. I never condone laying your hands on a dog to correct unless that act is with love. You only teach the dog to fear you.

      What is alike is their ability to scent, mark, and be dogs. Dogs can smell so much better than we can.

      In fact, according to PBS, “They possess up to 300 million olfactory receptors in their noses, compared to about six million in us. And the part of a dog’s brain that is devoted to analyzing smells is, proportionally speaking, 40 times greater than ours. Dogs’ noses also function quite differently than our own.” Imagine that, you washed that chair cover and your dog is thinking “um okay, I can smell that a mile away.” Dogs smell cancer, after all.

      I am passionate because to correct a behavior with positivity, you must think like the dog. When you do, the problem will be solved. Do not allow the dog access to the chair. The dog is marking, not giving spite. Spite and anger are human qualities. Passion is too, so I prefer to direct it to help people understand their dogs better.

      Hug your dog for me and have a wonderful week!

  31. Dogs absolutely do pee and poop for revenge. Mine does. This is not an accident or just a “marking” action. The only time my dog does this is when the dog doesn’t get to do something they want to do. The dog clearly knows it did something bad and is clearly riddled with guilt and hides afterwards. Maybe the term revenge feels too strong, because as humans our emotional responses and reasons for revenge can be much more broad and complex, but revenge on a basic primitive level is still revenge.

    Its really unscientific for anyone to say that it is “scientifically proven” that dogs don’t pee for revenge. You can do a study on one dog or a group of dogs, and just like a study on humans, there is no “science” involved, just a sampling of a very small population group with an extremely high margin of error. I’m a dog lover to, so I wish you were right about revenge actions, but there is no question that some dogs do take revenge actions.

  32. You all are crazy. There is no evidence that dogs are always “in the moment” or that they can’t do things out of spite. We don’t even have a proper breakdown of the HUMAN psyche! how can you all just say dogs can’t act out of spite when you have no proof they do. This whole article is literally just about what else it could be instead of spite, rather than any scientific facts. Plus, why would dogs be able to feel happy, sad, angry, jealous, and anxious but not be able to do things out of spite! Also, note this article is about how to stop a dog from peeing out of spite. You literally deny dogs can do it in the first place, so how is this article about how to stop something you don’t beleive exists in the first place! That’s like saying “how to summon god” and the first sentence is “god isn’t real”

  33. Dogs are smarter than you think. Two examples. When I come home I can always tell if my dog has peed in the crate. When I open door he normally cries or whines to welcome me. He can’t see me cause the crate is in the kitchen. When he whines I know he hasn’t peed. But when he does. Pee in the crate. Doesn’t mater when, He is as quiet as a mouse. And won’t even look at me. Not even a whisper. He can’t read my face from the other side of the wall or tell if i’m upset but he just knows he is wrong. When I have company and let him out of the crate and don’t let him play with them he will pee and when reprimand him to the crate he doesn’t make a sound. If i put him in the crate when he doesn’t commit an offense like at night sometimes, he gets upset. So much so that he will bang on the door of the crate. I usually keep the crate open and he sees it as his home. But he also knows when I close the door then something isn’t right. If he does something wrong and i ask him to go to his crate. He doesn’t get upset he goes and keeps quiet till i let him out. But if i ask him to go because i have company and not let him out. He will pee. You can call it anxiety or just his anger but the timing damn sure feels like revenge. He knows when he is wrong and he knows when he shouldn’t be punished. He will literally bang on the crate to get out if he feels unjustly punished. Jack russell are beyond smart. Probably smarter than most humans. Don’t sleep on dogs.

  34. Our dog is aging but she’s recently been peeing in the house at random! We let her out every hour but she’ll pee in a random spot in the house on the carpet when the majority of the house is wood floors. We’ll let her out, she’ll pee and then 30 mins later she’ll go upstairs to pee! She knows to go outside and she’ll go to the door to let us know that she wants to pee and we’ll let her out and she’ll pee but then she’ll go stand right in front of us after breakfast and stare at us and pee. We got her doggie diapers. This is frustrating indeed.

  35. I have 2 female huskies, both are potty trained and over a year old each, one of them however, if we stop giving her attention she urinates behind the couch or next to the chair, and lately on top of urinating she is now pooping, she has peed on our mattress while we are laying in the bed with her, and she pooped on my fiance’s pillow, while he was laying down. we have tried every method of potty training, from taking them out every hour, to directly taking them outside after an accident we have even tried the training treats for when they go outside we’ve even tried the spray that you spray in your yard. nothing has worked. I’m looking for help not conflict, every dog owner trains there dogs differently because every dogs behavior and personality is different. certain methods work for some dogs and others don’t, we have run out of methods can someone help us with a different solution

  36. How to prevent a female greyhound from peeing right after her meal? We always walk her and she does all her business outside of the house before we give her food. If she’s in the house, she knows exactly where to go for peeing, but she still pees right after having her own meal.

    We adopted the greyhound recently and she’s nine years old. We brought her to the vet to check her health and she seems fine and healthy. We have two other dogs, but they are gentle and never approach the greyhound during her meal.

  37. I have 2 year old Havanese. He never pees in the house, except on occasion in my son’s room. The door to his room is open all the time and he could come and go as he pleases, but he doesn’t. He only goes in when someone goes in the room with him and then he pees.. It could be my son, or me in the room. Doesn’t matter who enters the room, but he occasionally pees. He has done this randomly since he was a pup. Only that room and only if someone goes in with him. What gives?

  38. Im sorry but this is simply not true. I had 2 cats that use to deliverately pee inside for spite, many examples to proove it WAS out of spite but keeping this short. My dog now when mad for leaving him during day will, after he’s gone out and come back in, will pee and then run and hide. He knows what he done was wrong and wasn’t supposed to do it and was just outside but did it out of spite. So I disagree 💯 with your opinion. Dogs are smart, don’t be fooled that they have no ability to do things out of spite.

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